Revisiting a storybook character.

As Sandy Hook records another 12-14-12 memorial event, Cinderella has been opening her scrapbook and examining old pictures and clips. It never hurts to review our history, and, not surprisingly, others are following suit in an effort to understand what really happened that day and in the weeks and months (and years) preceding it.

One photo that appeared in the pages churned out by the mainstream press continues to haunt: Principal Dawn Lafferty Hochsprung dressed as a storybook fairy queen in a high-necked bridal gown while holding a star-tipped wand. The full-length photograph can still be viewed with a Google image search and a little luck. Here it is below:

bridal-photo-full-length-dlh

The photo appears to have been taken at Sandy Hook Elementary School on November 16, 2012, based on a related photo that appears on Mrs. Hochsprung’s Twitter account.

Mrs. Hochsprung’s fairy godmotherish appearance aside, does the photograph serve another purpose? Is it possibly an example of the predictive programming we have witnessed in connection with multiple disastrous events, including Sandy Hook? (Click here for more on that.)

More to the point, is it an example of “revelation of the method,” by which a gangster Cryptocracy mocks the public — revealing its devices before or even after creating a traumatic event? (Click here.)

Let’s examine the elements of the photograph more closely.

The missing head. What struck us as very odd is the way this photo was cropped in the Patch article where it first appeared. For some reason – a mistake? – the editor (Paul Singley*) cropped out Mrs. Hochsprung’s head, as shown in the truncated version below:

photo-of-headless-bride-that-appears-with-dlh-article

{from Patch article, “Sandy Hook Principal: Mother, Educator, Leader, Hero,” Jan. 24, 2013}

Mistake or not, the cropping has created an unfortunate visual pun: the “head” (of the school) is gone.  While we doubt that this was Patch’s intention, one has to acknowledge it. And there’s another possibility: the head was purposely cropped out to focus attention on the book beneath it.

Of course, the missing head photo could mean nothing at all. It’s likely a mistake someone overlooked and it has survived over the years as typos often do. But as readers of this blog know, Cinderella thinks we can learn a lot from people’s mistakes.

A book about a disaster. The star-tipped wand is posed and angled to point toward the title of the book. Given the way Mrs. Hochsprung is dressed, we might expect the storybook to be The Wizard of Oz or some other fable involving a fairy princess. But instead we find the title of a rhyming book popular among very young children: Chicka Chicka Boom Boom. More on that title below, but first let’s examine what the book is all about. Amazon provides the following description from Publisher’s Weekly:

“In this bright and lively rhyme, the letters of the alphabet race each other to the top of the coconut tree. When X, Y and Z finally scramble up the trunk, however, the weight is too much, and down they all tumble in a colorful chaotic heap: “Chicka Chicka . . . BOOM! BOOM!” All the family members race to help, as one by one the letters recover in amusingly battered fashion.”

“Boom! Boom!” Cinderella doesn’t need to tell her readers why that example of onomatopoiea is relevant to our subject.

Let’s take a look at an excerpt from one of the less enthusiastic customer reviews of Chicka Chick Boom Boom from Amazon’s review page: I think I just don’t get the appeal of this book, or maybe I’m not reading it with the right inflection. People love this book, including our baby sitter. I just don’t. It kinda outlines a disaster type scenario in a lighthearted way, that is really superficial (the coconut tree falls down with all the little children/alphabet letters in it and everyone is a little banged up). But it doesn’t really present this in a way that’s Mr. Roger’s like (“look for the helpers”), it just focuses on how banged up all the kids are.”

Interesting.

26 characters. Twenty-six people were reported to have been gunned down (“Boom!”) at Sandy Hook Elementary by Adam Lanza on 12-14-12. In Chicka Chicka Boom Boom, we have a story in which 26 characters (the letters of the alphabet) fall down and go boom at the base of a tree. It could be taken as prophetic forecasting of another disaster, obviously not by the book’s authors, but by someone or Something. You get my point. Of course, it may mean nothing at all.

sandy-hook-promise-tree

{Sandy Hook Promise symbolic “tree” logo: A large hand reaching up to 26 small hands}
~
All of the above may be nothing more than a string of coincidences, interesting ones that “rhyme” with the Sandy Hook 12-14-12 event. Or they may be the fingerprints of something else, of which predictive programming is but one possibility.
~
As for the title of the book Mrs. Hochsprung is holding in the photo, it’s a shame that such innocent words now carry the freight of coded sexual innuendo. Of course, there may be no connection whatsoever between such things and the storybook the fairy queen is holding. Cinderella is not making an accusation, merely an observation. There is a difference.
~

In a normal world, where children are valued and loved – and not exposed to unspeakable acts by depraved adults – discovering the sinister nestled cleverly within the innocent would be a rare occurrence. But that isn’t the world we live in, is it. Unfortunately not.

So we must conclude that there may be something wrong with this picture.

~C

*Paul Singley, the editor credited for the Patch article containing the cropped photo, was a friend of Mrs. Hochsprung’s. See the excerpt below from this article:

“Hochsprung took a personal interest in her employees, so much so that it changed the course of some of their lives. In addition to encouraging her to become a teacher, Hochsprung played matchmaker for Singley, introducing her to journalist Paul Singley, who was at the school covering an event for the local newspaper in November 2005.

The couple married three years later and now have a young daughter.

“She gave me the greatest gift anyone has ever given me,” an emotional Paul Singley, now a senior editor for the online news service Patch.com and an adjunct professor at a local community college, told the hundreds gathered in Naugatuck on Tuesday night. “I look at my daughter and I can’t help think she gave me another great gift in this world.””

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